How many horses have finished in front of Enable in her racing career?

Owned by Khalid Abdullah, trained by John Gosden, Enable has, of as April, 2019, won 10 of her 11 starts and just over £8 million in prize money. In October, 2018, she made history by becoming the first horse trained in England to win the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe for a second time and, a month later, did so again by becoming the first horse to win the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe and the Breeders’ Cup Turf in the same season.

Her victory in the Breeders’ Cup Turf was her eighth consecutive win at Group One, or Grade One, level, so it may come as a surprise to learn that she suffered the one defeat of her career, so far – albeit on just her second start – in a minor conditions stakes race at Newbury in April, 2017. Ridden, on that occasion, by William Buick, Enable stayed on well in the closing stages of the mile-and-a-quarter contest, but could only finish third, beaten 2½ lengths and a head. So, the number of horses that have finished in front of Enable in her racing career, so far, is just two, namely the winner that day, Shutter Speed, and the second horse home, Raheen House.

What is a betting ring inspector?

A betting ring inspector, nowadays better known as a betting ring manager, is a independent person, employed by Administration of Gambling on Tracks (AGT) Limited – which succeeded the National Joint Pitch Council in 2008 – who regulates and monitors on-course betting activity. A betting ring manager is present at every race meeting and his or her principal functions are to allocate pitches, each of which must be under the control of an accredited person, to enforce betting legislation and, if possible, to help resolve disputes between on-course bookmakers and the general public. In the event that a dispute cannot be resolved on the day of the race in question, the betting ring manager can complete an independent, unbiased report, which is forwarded, along with a dispute form completed by the member of the public involved, to the Tattersalls Committee for adjudication.

Which monarch founded Royal Ascot?

Ascot Racecourse was founded in 1711, by Queen Anne, who declared an area near Ascot, or ‘East Cote’, village ‘ideal for horses to gallop at full stretch’. The first race, Her Majesty’s Plate, was staged in August that year and, for a short time, Ascot Races was a highlight of the Court social calendar. However, Queen Anne died in August, 1714 and, thereafter, support for Ascot Racecourse dwindled, until its fortunes were revived by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, during the reign of his nephew, King George III, over five decades later. The first Royal Meeting, in a recognisable modern form – that is, a four-day meeting – was staged in 1768, with the first Royal Stand, which later became the Royal Enclosure, erected in 1790, and the first Royal Procession taking place in 1825, by which time King George IV was the ruling monarch.

Which was the most expensive racehorse ever?

Foaled on April 12, 1997, Fugaichi Pegasus was bought, as a yearling, by Japanese businessman Fusao Sekiguchi for a little over £3 million. Three years later, after a glittering racing career, which included victory in the Kentucky Derby in 2000, Fugaichi Pegasus was sold to Coolmore Stud, in Co. Tipperary, Ireland, for £53.7 million, making him the most expensive racehorse in history.

Indeed, Fugaichi Pegasus beat the previous record held by Shareef Dancer – a son of Northern Dancer, one of the most iconic sires of the twentieth century – who was bought, as a yearling, in 1981, by the late Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum, former Emir of Dubai, for £2.5 million, but syndicated for £24 million at the end of his racing career.

The most expensive ever sold at auction was The Green Monkey, who was bought for £325,000, as a yearling, by Florida pinhookers Randy Hartley and Dean de Renzo in 2005, but knocked down to Demi O’Byrne, representing Coolmore Stud, for £12 million as a two-year-old in 2006.

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